S – Emotional Intelligence Glossary

SEE (social-emotional education): This is a term used primarily by Jonathan Cohen from CSEE (Center for Social and Emotional Education) to describe an applicable form of emotional-social intelligence similar to SEL (social-emotional learning). This term refers to a wide array of approaches used to enhance emotional and social skills in education. These emotional and social skills, competencies and closely associated factors resembling the factorial components of what is currently referred to as emotional intelligence. Organizations such as CSEE and CASEL (Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning) began applying SEE more than two decades ago in North American schools; this activity has increased significantly since the publication of Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman in 1995 and now extends worldwide. Eight individuals who were instrumental in pioneering these efforts are Roger Weissberg, Maurice Elias, Mark Greenberg, Joseph Zins, Timothy Shriver, Norris Haynes, Eileen Growald and Jonathon Cohen.

SEL (social-emotional learning): This is a term used by individuals associated with CASEL (Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning) and CSEE (Center for Social and Emotional Education) to describe an applicable form of emotional-social intelligence similar to SEE (social-emotional education). This term refers to a wide array of approaches used to enhance emotional and social skills in education. These emotional and social skills, competencies and closely associated factors resembling the factorial components of what is currently referred to as emotional intelligence. Organizations like CASEL and CSEE began applying SEL more than two decades ago in North American schools; this activity has increased significantly since the publication of Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman in 1995 and now extends worldwide. Eight individuals who were instrumental in pioneering these efforts are Roger Weissberg, Maurice Elias, Mark Greenberg, Joseph Zins, Timothy Shriver, Norris Haynes, Eileen Growald and Jonathon Cohen.

Social: This adjective relates to the social or interpersonal aspect of emotional-social intelligence, or the interpersonal component of general intelligence as conceptualized by Howard Gardner in 1983.

Social and emotional competence: This term is nearly synonymous with emotional intelligence (EI) or, more accurately, emotional-social intelligence. More succinctly, it denotes one’s ability or capability to act in a socially and emotionally intelligent way.

Social and emotional competencies: This relates to the factorial components or social and emotional competencies and skills associated with emotional-social intelligence.

Social and emotional competency: This term is nearly synonymous with emotional intelligence (EI), or more accurately, emotional-social intelligence. More succinctly, it denotes one’s ability or capability to act in a socially and emotionally intelligence way.

Social and emotional functioning: This relates to functioning or performance which is social and emotional in nature, specifically those overt acts of human behavior which are driven by emotional-social intelligence.

Social and emotional intelligence: This is term is synonymous with emotional intelligence (EI).

Social and emotional IQ: This term denotes social and emotional intelligence in general, but more specifically the result of a measure that describes one’s overall level of social and emotional intelligence. It is often referred to as EQ.

Social competence: This is term is nearly synonymous with social intelligence.

Social competencies: These are the social competencies and skills associated with emotional intelligence (EI).

Social competency: This term is nearly synonymous with social intelligence.

Social intelligence: This term was used as early as 1920 by Thorndike to describe what is currently referred to as “emotional intelligence” (EI). His early definition of “social intelligence” later provided the basis for the 1990 Salovey-Mayer conceptualization of emotional intelligence.

Social IQ: This term denotes social intelligence, but more specifically the result of a measure that describes one’s overall level of social intelligence. An alternative descriptive for the latter has been “SQ” which is a term first coined by XXX (Hall) in the 1930s.

Social quotient (SQ): This term has been used to describe the result of a measure that describes one’s overall level of social intelligence. It was used by Edgar Doll in the 1930s.

Social skills: In the lay literature, this term refers to the social aspects of emotional-social intelligence. More succinctly, it describes an array of skills used in relating with other people such as the ability to seek, make and maintain interpersonal relationships.

Social-emotional competencies: This term is loosely used to refer to the social and emotional competencies associated with EI; and it suggests that the factorial components of emotional intelligence (EI) are competencies, which are more closely associated with abilities than skills but used vaguely to describe EI factors that might be somewhere between abilities and skills.

Social-emotional competency: This refers to the overall capability or capacity for social and emotional behavior.

Social-emotional education (SEE): This is a term used by Jonathan Cohen from CSEE (Center for Social and Emotional Education) to describe an applicable form of emotional-social intelligence similar to SEL (social-emotional learning). This refers to a wide array of approaches used to enhance emotional and social skills in education. These emotional and social skills, competencies and closely associated factors resemble the factorial components of what is currently referred to emotional intelligence. Organizations like CSEE and CASEL (Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning) began applying SEE more than two decades in North American schools; this activity has increased significantly since the publication of Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman in 1995 and now extends worldwide. Eight individuals who were instrumental in pioneering these efforts are Roger Weissberg, Maurice Elias, Mark Greenberg, Joseph Zins, Timothy Shriver, Norris Haynes, Eileen Growald and Jonathon Cohen.

Social-emotional intelligence: This term is very similar to emotional-social intelligence coined by Reuven Bar-On to describe the overall or wider construct of what is currently and popularly referred to as “emotional intelligence” (EI). It suggests that this construct is comprised of both social and emotional aspects and that it is difficult if not impossible to separate these conceptual components of the wider construct.

Social-emotional IQ: This term denotes social-emotional intelligence in general, but more specifically the result of a measure of social-emotional intelligence that describes one’s overall level of EI. It is important to note that “social-emotional” is a less popular term than “emotional-social” (as in emotional-social intelligence).

Social-emotional learning (SEL): This is a term used by individuals associated with CASEL (Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning) and CSEE (Center for Social and Emotional Education) to describe an applicable form of emotional-social intelligence similar to SEE (social-emotional education). This refers to a wide array of approaches used to enhance emotional and social skills in education. These emotional and social skills, competencies and closely associated factors resemble the factorial components of what is currently referred to emotional intelligence. Organizations like CASEL and CSEE began applying SEL more than two decades ago in North American schools; this activity has increased significantly since the publication of Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman in 1995 and now extends worldwide. Eight individuals who were instrumental in pioneering these efforts are Roger Weissberg, Maurice Elias, Mark Greenberg, Joseph Zins, Timothy Shriver, Norris Haynes, Eileen Growald and Jonathon Cohen.

SQ (social quotient): This term was coined in the 1930s by Edgar Doll, an Australian psychologist, to describe the level of social maturity obtained during childhood. He devised ways of measuring social functioning and maturity which are used today. Doll may have been inspired by Thorndike’s 1920 conceptualization of social intelligence as well as the beginning of cognitive testing.

Successful intelligence: The term “successful intelligence” was coined by Robert Sternberg to describe a type of human intelligence which is different from cognitive intelligence. It is possible that Sternberg was inspired by Gardner’s description of multiple intelligences in 1983.

 

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