P – Emotional Intelligence Glossary

Personal intelligences: This term was coined by Howard Gardner in 1983 as one of a number of human intelligences according to his conceptualization of this construct. Based on this conceptualization, personal intelligences include intrapersonal and interpersonal intelligences representing the emotional and social components of emotional-social intelligences respectively.

Peter Salovey: Peter Salovey, who is affiliated with Yale University in the United States, is a psychologist who co-developed the Salovey-Mayer model of emotional intelligence as well as the TMMSMEISMSCEIT and MSCEIT:YVto assess their conceptualization of this construct. Together with the Goleman and Bar-On models, the Salovey-Mayer model is considered to be one of the three leading models of emotional intelligence according to the Encyclopedia of Applied Psychology [2004]. He also co-authored or co-edited the following books on emotional intelligence: Emotional Development and Emotional Intelligence [1997], The Wisdom of Feeling [2002], Emotional Intelligence: Readings on the Mayer and Salovey Model [2004], and The Emotionally Intelligent Manager [2004].

PM (psychological mindedness): Psychological mindedness most likely evolved from alexithymia. The term itself was first used by Appelbaum in 1973 to describe the salutogenic or healthy end of the EI continuum (with alexithymia situated at the pathological end of this continuum). Although a relatively limited amount research has examined this concept, the way it is measured and applied, an attempt was made to use it as a straightforward method of evaluating an individual’s ability to benefit from psychotherapy. Much more research has been conducted on alexithymia – i.e., in excess of 1,000 scientific publications from the late 1940s to the close of the twentieth century.

Practical intelligence: The term “practical intelligence” was coined by Robert Sternberg in 1985 to describe a type of human intelligence which is different from cognitive intelligence (or “academic intelligence” as he refers to it). It is possible that Sternberg was inspired by Gardner’s description of multiple intelligences two years before.

Psychological mindedness (PM): Psychological mindedness most likely evolved from alexithymia. The term itself was first used by Appelbaum in 1973 to describe the salutogenic or healthy end of the EI continuum (with alexithymia situated at the pathological end of this continuum). Although a relatively limited amount research has examined this concept, the way it is measured and applied, an attempt was made to use it as a straightforward method of evaluating an individual’s ability to benefit from psychotherapy. Much more research has been conducted on alexithymia – i.e., in excess of 1,000 scientific publications from the late 1940s to the close of the twentieth century.

 

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